Book Review: Start Here

start-here-read-your-way-into-25-amazing-authors

Now that their Kickstarter campaign has delivered my e-book reward, I can finally review Start Here

Rating: 5/5

My tendency is to read the same types of books, again and again. It’s not that I’m unaware of the existence of other genres. I know that there are a host of wonderful authors just waiting to be discovered, and a zillion “best book” lists out there. I want to be in the know, and to broaden my literary horizons. It’s just that I don’t want to slog through mountains of information to find the good stuff – I need guidance.

This book fulfilled my need perfectly. It sticks to twenty-five stellar authors, many of whom I’ve heard of but never read, and some of whom I’d never heard of (clearly, I’m unhip). Each chapter helped to get me interested in something new, and told me what to expect along the journey. For authors I already know well, I think that the advice was spot on.

Often the suggestions ease you into the author’s work to prepare you for more challenging and rewarding things to come. Other times, the order helps you get maximum enjoyment from a best-loved work by introducing you to the author’s style and themes first; priming the pump, as it were. What a nice way to go. I can’t wait to dive in.

The Nerd’s Guide to Reading

My never-ending hunt for new books to read continues, and the latest find is a goldmine: The Nerd’s Guide to Reading. How do I know it’s fantastic? Many of the books that I’ve already read are among my all-time favorites, so I’m thinking that the rest are worthy of consideration.

Genres include popular science, history, classics, fantasy, and science fiction. It seems like I’ll never have enough time to read everything I’ve added to my list lately, but I think that’s actually pretty wonderful.

Science Fiction – A Nerd’s Guide to Reading

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Reading: Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math

The backdrop of my childhood included the threat of a global nuclear war that would essentially wipe humankind from the face of the planet. When the Soviet Union collapsed and the Cold War ended, I was overjoyed. It renewed my faith that, when there’s something we can do about it, we ultimately have the will and wisdom to avoid catastrophe.

Then global warming started making headlines, and I thought for sure that we’d do something about it. After all, if for some reason the vast majority of scientists on our planet are wrong, the downside is survivable. If they’re right, the downside means the end of human life as we know it on our planet.

Since then, I’ve done what I can, as have many others, but it hasn’t been enough. It seems my optimism was naive. We may be the last people who could’ve done something to stop this, but didn’t. This bothers me so deeply. Bill McKibben’s ideas in Rolling Stone are fantastic, but I’m losing hope.

Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math
Bill McKibben, Rolling Stone